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  • Citrine -One of November's Birthstones
  • Post author
    Sandra Jeffs

Citrine -One of November's Birthstones

   

Citrine is a quartz stone that has been valued for centuries. Citrine was often confused with topaz and, today, topaz and citrine are November’s Birthstone. It is a fairly rare stone in its natural state. Most citrine on the market today has been heat treated to bring out the warm yellow colors of citrine from an amethyst (or smokey quartz) gemstone. Citrines are often found near amethyst due to their close chemical relationship. Indeed, amethyst and citrine can form together and are called “ametrine.” [See ametrine photos below]

 

 

Citrine is a fairly hard stone at 7 on the MOHS scale and is prized for its durability as well as its beauty.

History

Citrine has been used for centuries and was often carried by merchants to bring luck and abundance in business. It is the best stone for manifestation of all kinds of abundance. Roman pontiffs wore citrine rings and Egyptians collected them and carved them into talismans to use for good luck and abundance.

People felt that the colors of citrine expressed the color of the sun and valued it for its deep, rich colors. In ancient times it was thought to be the finest form of topaz until modern gemology determined it to be in the quartz family.              Citrine comes naturally in shades from a pale yellow, to warm yellow, yellow-brown, brown, and orange. “The finest citrine color is a saturated yellow to reddish orange that is free of brownish tints.”

Types of citrine Jewelry

One can find citrine jewelry in a wide range of sizes, even up to 20 carats. All the usual cuts are used with citrine, e.g., round, cushion, emerald, oval, pear, and trillium as well as a lot of unusual and designer cuts. Citrine lends itself to cuts that show off the magnificent colors of yellow-brown and orange that shine from it. Today, citrine is most prized when its shade is an earthy, deep, brownish or reddish orange.  

Buying Citrine

As said earlier, high quality citrine was confused for topaz in the past. Today, citrine that is clear and a warm brown-yellow, free of treatment, is expensive. If you see citrine and it is expensive, ask the dealer for a certification that it is untreated. Otherwise, it might not be a good purchase at that price. Most citrine on the market today is treated and rather inexpensive. A topaz stone in the warm brown-yellow will be exceedingly expensive because it is extremely rare, compared to citrine which is just rare. Citrine is usually not dyed, but topaz is often dyed.

Care of Citrine

Citrine is a hard-enough stone that you do not have to be too careful with slight bumps to the stone. Any stone, however, will fracture if hit with a strong blow. It is in the quartz family so it could scratch if exposed to sand across its surface or harsh chemicals.

Do not expose to intense light for a long period as that could change its color.

Clean with warm, soapy water, rinse and dry with a soft cloth. You can use an ultrasonic cleaner but DO NOT USE STEAM CLEANING due to the high heat used in steam cleaning.

Meaning of Citrine

Citrine is one of the best stones for manifestation and abundance. It is considered “the merchant’s stone.” It also enhances one’s imagination, creativity and helps to empower a person. It helps transitions as it takes in energy and transforms it positively. It is said to take in the sun’s rays, its power, and send it to the wearer.

Written by Sandra Jeffs

  • Post author
    Sandra Jeffs

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